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Congress Institutes

WAIMH Affiliate Congress Institute – Running an Infant Mental Health Organisation: Models of Working

Chaired by Anna Huber (PhD) and Jane Barlow

This institute will be facilitated by the WAIMH Affiliates Council in response to feedback from Affiliates, and will explore the realities, challenges and local solutions of running an infant mental health association. Drawing on member examples from around the world, each regional workshop will present a variety of models of running an infant mental health association and share ideas about how common challenges might be addressed, including through our WAIMH connection. Participants will gain an understanding of context specific as well as common needs and how different organisations have responded to these needs.

We have adapted the original format to suit our hybrid live and online congress in/from Brisbane 2021, so the institute will be run live in three one hour parts at region friendly times to enable both onsite, regional and online participation. Sessions will be recorded for access during the congress and online afterwards for six months.

Sessions 1&2 will focus on brief presentations by invited Affiliate presidents or representatives, of how they have developed their local associations in response to their social, political and economic contexts to build awareness, education and support for infant mental health.

Presenters from each organisation will briefly describe their organisation’s history and current structure, the size and range of backgrounds of their membership, how the organisation is funded and their financial circumstances, activities they engage in to carry out their aims, their main operational challenges and the advantages of WAIMH Affiliation.

Session 3 will summarise themes that emerge from the first two sessions. This discussion will also be informed by research from a study into the sustainability of IMH organisations currently being undertaken by the Alliance for Infant Mental Health. This will be presented as a live discussion between Affiliate Chair, Anna Huber (Australia), Affiliate Representative Jane Barlow (UK), Nichole Paradis from Alliance for Infant Mental Health and Nicole Milburn (Australian AIMH).

Specifically, panelists and workshop participants will be invited to share innovative solutions and ideas to address common challenges such as:

  • Engaging and retaining members
  • Becoming financially viable and generating adequate income to carry out aims
  • Making the organisation sustainable over time

Finding ways to easily connect with other WAIMH affiliates and members to support these goals will also be discussed.

Session 1 (Wednesday 23rd June Brisbane time 7.30pm one hour) will feature affiliate presidents presenting from Europe, UK and Africa. (Chair Jane Barlow)

Europe: Piret Visnapuu-Bernadt Estonian Association
Africa: Nicole Canin Gauteng Association for IMH
UK: Jane Barlow UK Association for Infant Mental Health

Session 2 (Friday 25th June Brisbane time 8.30am one hour) will feature affiliate presidents presenting from North and South America. (Chair Anna Huber)

North America: Claud Bisaillon Quebec Association
Sheryl Goldberg Michigan Association for IMH
South America: Clara Schejtmann Argentinian Association for IMH (online)

Session 3 (Saturday 26th June Brisbane time 6am one hour) Summary and discussion

Anna Huber WAIMH Affiliate Council Chair
Jane Barlow WAIMH Affiliate Council Representative
Nichole Paradis: Executive Director, Alliance for Infant Mental Health
Nicole Milburn Australia/Oceania Australian Association for IMH
Asian representatives encouraged to attend.

Australian Affiliate Congress Institute - Continuing Cultures: Stories that generate social, emotional, spiritual and cultural wellbeing for infants and families.

Broadening and enriching WAIMH’s focus on understandings of strong, healthy children, families and communities is at the forefront of this Institute.

In this four-part gathering we will hear from cultural representatives and service providers whose focus is on infants’ social and emotional health in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, in families in the Pacific and in Asian families, including the diverse ways social, emotional and spiritual well – being are generated for the youngest members of their cultures. Commitments to practices that demonstrate cultural continuity will be embedded in these stories.

To conclude a multicultural, multidisciplinary panel will comment on commonalities and key differences in these stories. Recommendations to WAIMH are likely to emerge for it’s ongoing attention to and appreciation of diversity and richness in these and other continuing and dynamic cultures which demonstrate how their infants flourish and thrive.

Part 1 – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture

Co-chairs:

Helen Milroy

Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Professor at the University of Western Australia, Commissioner with the National Mental Health Commission, Australia Helen Milroy is a descendant of the Palyku people of the Pilbara region of Western Australia but was born and educated in Perth. Currently Helen is a Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Professor at the University of Western Australia and Commissioner with the National Mental Health Commission. Helen has been on state and national mental health advisory committees and boards with a particular focus on Indigenous mental health as well as the wellbeing of children. From 2013-2017 Helen was a Commissioner for the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

Maree Foley

Child, Family, and Organisational Consultant, Geneva, Switzerland.

Maree Foley Ph.D. is a Child, Family, and Organisational Consultant in Geneva, Switzerland. Maree started her career in the late 1980’s as a Social Worker. From the mid 1990’s Maree practiced as a registered child psychotherapist, in the public, private and civil society sectors in New Zealand. She also has researched in the area of attachment theory and work-place relationships and practiced as an organisational consultant. She is currently engaged with research concerning infant mental health and global public health. She is the past President of the Infant Mental Health Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (IMHAANZ). From 2010-2018 she was an Executive board member of the World Association for Infant Mental Health (WAIMH). From 2019, as Editor-in-Chief of WAIMH Perspectives in Infant Mental Health, Maree is a general WAIMH Board member.

Campbell Paul

Infant Psychiatrist, Royal Children’s Hospital and The Royal Women’s Hospital Melbourne and Honorary Principal Fellow, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne

Campbell Paul is a Consultant Infant Psychiatrist at the Royal Children’s and Royal Women’s Hospitals Melbourne. With colleagues at the University of Melbourne he has delivered postgraduate courses in Infant and Parent Mental Health since 1992. These courses developed out of a longstanding experience in paediatric consultation-liaison psychiatry and infant-parent psychotherapy. He has a special interest in the understanding of the inner world of the baby, particularly as it informs therapeutic work with infants and their parents. With Frances Salo he has developed models of working in therapeutic groups with troubled parents and infants. Campbell has been the director of the Australian training centre for the Newborn Behavioural Observation program at the Royal Women’s Hospital Melbourne. He is President the World Association for Infant Mental Health.

Speakers:

Kathy Crouch

Lead Practitioner for the Early Years, Mallee District Aboriginal Service

Kathy is originally from the Central Coast of NSW. A registered psychologist, with a background in disability, behavioural analysis and trauma reprocessing, she managed Mildura’s Child and Youth Mental Health Services for a decade before moving to Mallee District Aboriginal Service as the Lead Practitioner for the Early Years. She now shares a strategic therapeutic systems role across MDAS, supporting staff, families, and Community by trying to connect attachment and trauma informed systems with Service design and delivery.

Darlene Thomas

Executive Cultural Advisor, Mallee District Aboriginal Service

Darlene is local Barkindji women linked to the Sunraysia district. Darlene has had 23 years of experience in working with her local communities and abroad with other ethnic communities. Darlene is the Strategic Advisor to the CEO and Executive to the Community and Cultural Engagement team.

In the 23 years Darlene has working extensively with women and children victims/survivors of family violence and/or sexual abuse, Community mentoring and employment for Men, Women and Children, social and emotional wellbeing for children and adults and working in the areas of justice diversion. Darlene is also a director on the board of Djirra (Aboriginal Family Violence legal service) and was a delegate at the 2018 COAG summit speaking to effects of systems on women and children affected by family violence.

Courtney Law

Program Manager, Birthing in Our Community

Descending from the Wulli Wulli and neighbouring Wakka Wakka Nations my blood line runs deep through the North Burnett and Auburn regions. Growing up away from my ancestral home lands I have always maintained my connection to country, through my matrilineality. Continually learning from my elders and passing their knowledge onto my three daughters, so that they stay grounded in life, and sustain their connection. Being married to a strong Goenpul, Yuggera, Wakka Wakka, Kullali man it is imperative our connections and values are maintained and passed on for future generations. I am also proud to call Inala my home, working for and supporting my community is my passion. Working within a program that allows us to embrace diversity, support families and to be able to support the empowerment of woman and follow them through their pregnancy journey, is so important to the empowerment of our communities as a whole, and one that I am truly proud to be a part of.

Susan Gobbart

Perinatal and Parenting Psychologist, Birthing in Our Community

I was born in Tasmania, grew up in Victoria and have lived in Queensland for the past 20 years. I feel at home and connected to Qld. My passion is supporting and empowering people to be the person they want to be. I have two gorgeous kids, a son Jeremy and daughter Ella. I have 2 rescue dogs called Shadow and Scruffy and 2 cats called Mamma and Mini. I love long distance hiking, exploring other countries and cultures and getting out of the city as often as possible.

Megan McGrath

Senior Project Lead-Communities for Children, Save the Children

Megan McGrath has worked in the development and humanitarian sector for over 15 years, having wide-ranging experience in Early Childhood Development and Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in emergency response contexts. Her field experience includes complex humanitarian emergencies such as northern Uganda, Somalia, Sudan, Gaza and the Syria response. She has recently transitioned into working in remote Aboriginal communities in the East Kimberley region of Australia with Save the Children, working as the Senior Project Lead for the federally funded Communities for Children program.

Kerrianne Trust

Team Leader, Child and Parents Centre, Wunan Foundation, Kununurra, Northern Territory

Kerrianne Trust has worked in Early Childhood Education sector for the last 25 years, having a wide experience in Early Childhood Development and Education. Her field of experiences include working in Early Childhood Education in Indigenous communities in Western Australia remote East Kimberley region.

She is currently working with the Wunan Foundation as Team Leader, Child, and Parents Centre in Kununurra. Wunan Foundation is a not-for-profit organisation based in the East Kimberley.

Part 2 – Pacific Culture

Co-chairs:

Dr Nick Kowalenko

Acting Head and Child Psychiatrist, Consultation and Liaison Team
Sydney Children’s Hospital Network, Randwick Campus.

Dr. Nick Kowalenko is a psychiatrist with experience in leadership roles providing policy advice to state, national and international organisations. He is Vice President and Oceania Coordinator International Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professionals (IACAPAP), and Deputy Chair, RANZCP Pacific Steering Group and immediate post chair, RANZCP Faculty of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

He is also Deputy Chair of Emerging Minds, which is developing Australia’s Digital National Workforce Centre for Children’s Mental Health (0-11years) & Chair, Tresillian Family Services championing workforce development and the promotion of parental, infant and early childhood mental health.

Maree Foley

Child, Family, and Organisational Consultant, Geneva, Switzerland.

Maree Foley Ph.D. is a Child, Family, and Organisational Consultant in Geneva, Switzerland. Maree started her career in the late 1980’s as a Social Worker. From the mid 1990’s Maree practiced as a registered child psychotherapist, in the public, private and civil society sectors in New Zealand. She also has researched in the area of attachment theory and work-place relationships and practiced as an organisational consultant. She is currently engaged with research concerning infant mental health and global public health. She is the past President of the Infant Mental Health Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (IMHAANZ). From 2010-2018 she was an Executive board member of the World Association for Infant Mental Health (WAIMH). From 2019, as Editor-in-Chief of WAIMH Perspectives in Infant Mental Health, Maree is a general WAIMH Board member.

Speakers:

Lynaire Doherty

Ohomairangi Trust, New Zealand

Lynaire has firstly worked in special education as an early intervention teacher and then as a psychologist within government organisations. Lyn, as a psychologist believes passionately in the idea that the parent-child relationship is a critical source of resilience at individual, whānau and community levels.

Fifteen years ago Lyn helped establish Ohomairangi Trust, a not for profit, NGO, Kaupapa Maori early intervention service, to better support whanau and to develop this idea in a practical way. A consequence of this was the establishment of a remarkable programme known as ‘Hoki ki te Rito – Oranga Whānau’. The programme is held one a day week, over a 14 week period, builds on relationship, offering home visits and parenting support. Lynaire believes that, “It has become clear to us that history doesn’t have to repeat itself. It is possible for parents who have had difficult childhoods to make sense of their experiences”.

Lyn is of Ngati Porou and Ngapuhi iwi descent. She is a mother of four and grandmother of six children. She recently graduated as a Doctor of Philosophy - PhD from Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences in department of Psychological Medicine University of Auckland.

Norah Simon

Ministry of Health Vanuatu.
Mental Health Department, Vanuatu

Norah Simon became Vanuatu’s first female mental health nurse working for the Ministry of Health Vanuatu. After beginning work in 2012 as a General Registered nurse, from 2014 she began working at the Mental Health Department, MindCare clinic. She works as a case manager of child and adolescent cases in the hospital clinic. She does weekly home visits to patients who default their clinic appointments.

In addition, she assists at Mental Health and Psychological Support Services (MHPSS) and Psychological First Aid (PFA) workshops and trainings in the urban and remote communities which were affected by Tropical Cyclone Harold which hit in April 2020.

She lives in Port Vila, Vanuatu and a proud mother of 1 son. Norah Marie Simon

Dr. Monica Kakirau-Hagali MBBS, MMED (Psychiatry), MCHIC

Chief Psychiatrist, National Department of Health, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

Dr. Monica Kakirau- Hagali graduated with MBBS from the Medical Faculty, University of Papua New Guinea in 1991. Her working life began with two years of Residency in various hospitals in Papua New Guinea. Prior to beginning her Postgraduate training in Psychiatry at the University of Papua New Guinea, she worked as a General Medical Practitioner at the Lorengau General Hospital on Manus Island, a job that introduced her to administration when she was appointed as the Acting Director of Medical Services.

Dr. Monica Kakirau-Hagali holds a postgraduate Master of Medicine in Psychiatry (MMED (Psychiatry) ( from UPNG) and Master of Mental Health in Child and Adolescent (MCHIC) from the New South Wales Institute of Psychiatry, in Sydney . She is the only Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist in Papua New Guinea. Currently she works for the National Department of Health as the Chief Psychiatrist and as the Acting Clinical Coordinator for Psychiatric Unit at the Port Moresby General Hospital.

Her role as honorary lecturer at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, UPNG has seen her participate actively in teaching and training of both the undergraduate and postgraduate psychiatry students since 2002.

She was instrumental in linking the International Child and Adolescent Mental Health (iCAMH) team with the University of Papua New Guinea in 2016.

In 2019 Dr. Monica Kakirau- Hagali was appointed a Member of the Parole Board of Papua New Guinea representing the Secretary for Health. Since then she has worked closely with the Department of Justice and Attorney General and the Correctional Institution Services conducting Parole Board Hearings in the different Prisons in the country.

She has co-presented at numerous Pacific Forums

Part 3 - Asian Culture

Five of the top eight most populous countries in the world are in Asia. In this symposium infant mental health clinicians from China, India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, the Philippines, and Japan will discuss the contribution that the field of infant mental health can make to the lives of trouble and stressed infants and their families. The range of cultural diversity throughout Asia is huge and the challenges facing families diverse. Some of the common phenomena confronting families through Asia now include the impact of cultural change, digital technology but of course limited resources for huge populations, poverty and the challenges parental and infant mental health stress and disorder. The process of global change will also have increasing impact on the lives of very young children and their families. Panel members will discuss recent developments in infant mental health through the region and how important is a clinical understanding of the infant, the family and their current world experience and cultural heritage.

Co-Chairs:

Dr Hisako Watanabe

Former Director, Mental Health Division, Dept. Paediatrics, Keio University
Current Vice-Chair, Life Development Center, Watanabe Clinic, Yokohama, Japan

Hisako Watanabe is a child psychiatrist in Japan who has integrated Western trans-disciplinary, neurobiological, and psychodynamic approaches with Japanese concept of Amae. Trained at the Tavistock Clinic, she has participated in WAIMH activities since 1986, and has pursued manifold practice and research. She founded a national forum for studies of infants and neonatal development support in Japan, conducted post-disaster care of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and made outreach visit to Bangladesh. She maintains that WAIMH has a crucial role in this pandemic by responding to diverse voices from around the world.

Maree Foley

Child, Family, and Organisational Consultant, Geneva, Switzerland.

Maree Foley Ph.D. is a Child, Family, and Organisational Consultant in Geneva, Switzerland. Maree started her career in the late 1980’s as a Social Worker. From the mid 1990’s Maree practiced as a registered child psychotherapist, in the public, private and civil society sectors in New Zealand. She also has researched in the area of attachment theory and work-place relationships and practiced as an organisational consultant. She is currently engaged with research concerning infant mental health and global public health. She is the past President of the Infant Mental Health Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (IMHAANZ). From 2010-2018 she was an Executive board member of the World Association for Infant Mental Health (WAIMH). From 2019, as Editor-in-Chief of WAIMH Perspectives in Infant Mental Health, Maree is a general WAIMH Board member.

Speakers:

Dr Hisako Watanabe, Japan

Uniting in Harmony to Cope with Current and Newly Emerging Challenges of Infant Mental Health in Asia

Hisako Watanabe is a child psychiatrist in Japan who has integrated Western trans-disciplinary, neurobiological, and psychodynamic approaches with Japanese concept of Amae. Trained at the Tavistock Clinic, she has participated in WAIMH activities since 1986, and has pursued manifold practice and research. She founded a national forum for studies of infants and neonatal development support in Japan, conducted post-disaster care of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and made outreach visit to Bangladesh. She maintains that WAIMH has a crucial role in this pandemic by responding to diverse voices from around the world.

Professor Satya Raj, India

Professor in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Unit, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India

Setting up of an Infant Mental Health Clinic in a tertiary care hospital set up in India.

Dr Satya Raj is a Professor in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Unit, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. Dr Raj has set up an innovative in infant mental health clinic in Vellore. She has completed her Diploma in Psychological Medicine, MD (Psychiatry) and her Diplomate of the National board. She is a Fellow of the Royal Australian New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. She has published more than 20 papers in national and international journals and is currently engaged in the three research projects regarding mood disorders in children, and on the impact of Covid-19 on the psychological well-being of children. She has produced a research guide and supervises students in psychiatry.

Dr Joyce Mok, Hong Kong

Head, Department of Clinical Psychology, United Christian Hospital, Hospital Authority, Hong Kong SAR, China

Raising a child the Chinese way: The Hong Kong practice

Joyce Mok, Ph.D. is Senior Clinical Psychologist, Head, Department of Clinical Psychology, United Christian Hospital, and President, Hong Kong Association for Infant Mental Health Limited. Dr. Mok received her clinical psychology training in Hong Kong and has been working as a clinical psychologist in the Hospital Authority for over 30 years, with a special interest in infant mental health (IMH). In regard to her clinical work, she has set up the Infant and Early Childhood Psychological Service in her workplace, offering specialized assessment and intervention for young children under five. She is actively involved in DIR/Floortime training for ASD young kids, infant cases with feeding problems, parent-child dyadic relationship assessment, attachment-based parenting, and Child-Parent Psychotherapy. She enjoys observing babies and working with their caregivers. In 2014, she initiated the establishment of the Hong Kong Association for Infant Mental Health with a group of professionals to bring the IMH training to Hong Kong clinicians and to advocate for the IMH among the public.

Dr Joy Malinit, Philippines

Head, Section of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Child Neuroscience Division, Philippine Children’s Medical Center
Professor & Consultant, University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, Quezon City, Philippines.

Directions and Developments in Infant Mental Health in the Philippines

Dr Malinit is a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist with a special commitment to developing the field of infant mental health in the Philippines. As Head of the Section of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Child Neuroscience Division of the Philippines Children’s Medical Centre she has developed the field of infant mental health, supporting colleagues across all disciplines to engage with stressed infants and parents.

Professor Guan Hongyan, China

Professor, Department of Early Childhood Development, Capital Institute of Paediatrics, Beijing , China

The Development and Progress for Mental Health in Infant and Young Children, and the Impact of Covid-19 on the Infant and Family.

Professor Guan Hongyan has a Doctor of Medicine and a Ph.D and is Professor at the Department of Early Childhood Development at the Capital Institute of Pediatrics in Chaoyang District, Beijing

Professor Dr. Tjhin Wiguna, Indonesia

Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Division, Department of Psychiatry, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital
Professor, Department of Psychiatry & Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia

The Hidden Story of Infant Mental Health Supports in Indonesia

Tjhin Wiguna, is a child and adolescent psychiatrist works at Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine University of Indonesia and dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital.

Dr Erum Mariam, Bangladesh

Executive Director of BRAC IED (Institute of Educational Development) BRAC University, Bangladesh

Ensuring a system of care for Bangladeshi and Rohingya caregivers.

Erum Mariam is the Executive Director of BRAC IED (Institute of Educational Development) BRAC University, in Bangladesh. Mariam completed her PhD in Education from Cambridge University in 2008. She has extensive experience of scaling up education interventions both nationally and globally and was involved in the expansion of the unique BRAC run Non-Formal Primary (NFP) Schools in the 1990s. Since 2008, Mariam has promoted BRAC IED’s vision of contributing to the improvement of quality, equity, and efficiency in the education system in partnership with the public sector. The globally recognized Play Labs and Humanitarian Play Labs have been developed under her leadership, focusing on early stimulation and children’s wellbeing in diverse settings.

Part 4 – Panel Discussion

Chair:

Maree Foley

Child, Family, and Organisational Consultant, Geneva, Switzerland.

Maree Foley Ph.D. is a Child, Family, and Organisational Consultant in Geneva, Switzerland. Maree started her career in the late 1980’s as a Social Worker. From the mid 1990’s Maree practiced as a registered child psychotherapist, in the public, private and civil society sectors in New Zealand. She also has researched in the area of attachment theory and work-place relationships and practiced as an organisational consultant. She is currently engaged with research concerning infant mental health and global public health. She is the past President of the Infant Mental Health Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (IMHAANZ). From 2010-2018 she was an Executive board member of the World Association for Infant Mental Health (WAIMH). From 2019, as Editor-in-Chief of WAIMH Perspectives in Infant Mental Health, Maree is a general WAIMH Board member.

Panelists:

Helen Milroy

Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Professor at the University of Western Australia, Commissioner with the National Mental Health Commission, Australia

Helen Milroy is a descendant of the Palyku people of the Pilbara region of Western Australia but was born and educated in Perth. Currently Helen is a Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Professor at the University of Western Australia and Commissioner with the National Mental Health Commission. Helen has been on state and national mental health advisory committees and boards with a particular focus on Indigenous mental health as well as the wellbeing of children. From 2013-2017 Helen was a Commissioner for the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

Nick Kowalenko

Acting Head and Child Psychiatrist, Consultation and Liaison Team
Sydney Children’s Hospital Network, Randwick Campus.

Dr. Nick Kowalenko is a psychiatrist with experience in leadership roles providing policy advice to state, national and international organisations. He is Vice President and Oceania Coordinator International Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professionals (IACAPAP), and Deputy Chair, RANZCP Pacific Steering Group and immediate post chair, RANZCP Faculty of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
He is also Deputy Chair of Emerging Minds, which is developing Australia’s Digital National Workforce Centre for Children’s Mental Health (0-11years) & Chair, Tresillian Family Services championing workforce development and the promotion of parental, infant and early childhood mental health.

Hisako Watanabe

Former Director, Mental Health Division, Dept. Paediatrics, Keio University
Current Vice-Chair, Life Development Center, Watanabe Clinic, Yokohama, Japan

Hisako Watanabe is a child psychiatrist in Japan who has integrated Western trans-disciplinary, neurobiological, and psychodynamic approaches with Japanese concept of Amae. Trained at the Tavistock Clinic, she has participated in WAIMH activities since 1986, and has pursued manifold practice and research. She founded a national forum for studies of infants and neonatal development support in Japan, conducted post-disaster care of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and made outreach visit to Bangladesh. She maintains that WAIMH has a crucial role in this pandemic by responding to diverse voices from around the world.

Campbell Paul

Infant Psychiatrist, Royal Children’s Hospital and The Royal Women’s Hospital Melbourne and Honorary Principal Fellow, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne

Campbell Paul is a Consultant Infant Psychiatrist at the Royal Children’s and Royal Women’s Hospitals Melbourne. With colleagues at the University of Melbourne he has delivered postgraduate courses in Infant and Parent Mental Health since 1992. These courses developed out of a longstanding experience in paediatric consultation-liaison psychiatry and infant-parent psychotherapy. He has a special interest in the understanding of the inner world of the baby, particularly as it informs therapeutic work with infants and their parents. With Frances Salo he has developed models of working in therapeutic groups with troubled parents and infants. Campbell has been the director of the Australian training centre for the Newborn Behavioural Observation program at the Royal Women’s Hospital Melbourne. He is President the World Association for Infant Mental Health.

Anna Huber

Psychologist, Families in Mind, Canberra

Dr Anna Huber is a psychologist with long experience in educational, developmental, community and private practice contexts. After leading the development of an infant and early childhood mental health service in a community agency from 2005-2012, Anna now works in a relationally focused private practice with families of infants and young children. She also provides supervision and consultation to practitioners and managers working in community-based child and family programs in Australia and New Zealand. As a pioneer user of Circle of Security in Australia, Anna has been accredited as COS-Intensive provider since 2007, a COS-P provider since 2010, a COS supervisor since 2008, a trainer of COS supervisors since 2015 and a COS-P trainer since 2016. Anna completed her PhD in 2016 researching the effectiveness of the Circle of Security Intensive Intervention with young children and their families. She continues to be actively involved in real world research and evaluation efforts to build better evidence from practice, working with Macquarie University Centre for Emotional Health. Anna is also on the board of the World Association for Infant Mental Health, representing practitioners & researchers around the world working with infants and their families.

Nicole Milburn

Clinical Psychologist and Infant Mental Health Specialist

Nicole is a Clinical Psychologist and Infant Mental Health Specialist who works throughout Victoria from her base in Melbourne. In addition to general psychotherapy to adults and families, she has conducted therapeutic assessments of infants and children who have been maltreated for more than 20 years and provides training in the Working Model of the Child Interview and Crowell Procedure throughout Australia